Sep 30, 2013
Franz Kafka’s signature in a letter to Milena Jesenská. It reads:
Franz wrong,  F  wrong, Yours wrongnothing more, calm, deep forest
Prague; July 29, 1920.

Franz Kafka’s signature in a letter to Milena Jesenská. It reads:

Franz wrong,  F  wrong, Yours wrong
nothing more, calm, deep forest

Prague; July 29, 1920.

(Source: bellswithin, via fuckyeahmanuscripts)

Aug 27, 2013
artnet
Negative Blue
This piece from Tom Wesselmann’s series of maquettes done in the 1990s serves as a strong example of the artist’s period of exploration in Abstract Expressionism.

artnet

Negative Blue

This piece from Tom Wesselmann’s series of maquettes done in the 1990s serves as a strong example of the artist’s period of exploration in Abstract Expressionism.

Aug 6, 2013
artnet
To create witty, bold, and often deceiving images based on art history, Vik Muniz incorporates unusual and everyday materials such as dust,  diamonds, sugar, ketchup, caviar, and wire into his photographic process. The artist borrows from pop culture and Old Masters such as Georges Seurat and Vincent Van Gogh to make his works more familiar, calling this approach the “worst possible illusion”. 
Pictured is his 2007 work, Jacqueline, After Picasso. 

artnet

To create witty, bold, and often deceiving images based on art history, Vik Muniz incorporates unusual and everyday materials such as dust,  diamonds, sugar, ketchup, caviar, and wire into his photographic process. The artist borrows from pop culture and Old Masters such as Georges Seurat and Vincent Van Gogh to make his works more familiar, calling this approach the “worst possible illusion”. 

Pictured is his 2007 work, Jacqueline, After Picasso. 

Aug 6, 2013
You have killed my love. You used to stir my imagination. Now you don’t even stir my curiosity. You simply produce no effect. I loved you because you were marvelous, because you had genius and intellect, because you realized the dreams of great poets and gave shape and substance to the shadows of art. You have thrown it all away. You are shallow and stupid.
from The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890) by Oscar Wilde
Jul 22, 2013
 
Excerpt from Tolkien’s Illustrated Lord of the Rings

 

Excerpt from Tolkien’s Illustrated Lord of the Rings

(via fuckyeahmanuscripts)

May 19, 2013
artnet
This 1982 work by graffiti artist Keith Haring was created with Day-Glo colors! 

artnet

This 1982 work by graffiti artist Keith Haring was created with Day-Glo colors! 

Apr 28, 2013
I was looking into the vast interior of the universe, as if the universe were quietly turning itself inside out. Stars behind stars and stars behind stars behind stars until there was nothing between them, nothing beyond them, but dusty dim gold of stars and no space and no light but stars. The moon was gone. The water lapped higher, nearer, touching the rock so lightly it was audible only as a kind of vibration. The sea had fallen dark, in submission to the stars. And the stars seemed to move as if one could see the rotation of the heavens as a kind of vast crepitation, only now there were no more events, no shooting stars, no falling stars, which human senses could grasp or even conceive of. All was movement, all was change, and somehow this was visible and yet unimaginable. And I was no longer I but something pinned down as an atom, an atom of an atom, a necessary captive spectator, a tiny mirror into which it was all indifferently beamed, as it motionlessly seethed and boiled, gold behind gold behind gold.
A dream sequence from The Sea, the Sea (1978) by Iris Murdoch
Apr 26, 2013

artnet

From Valentino to Pelé and a rare self-portrait, check out Andy Warhol's  fantastic polaroids

Apr 26, 2013

Autographed letter from Victor Hugo to the committee members for the statue of George Sand La Chatre

(Source: maisonhugo, via fuckyeahmanuscripts)

Mar 7, 2013
artnet
This fantastic hand-painted multiple by Shepard Fairey is an homage to Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The art world’s recent embrace of Street Art as a legitimate genre demonstrates the power of accessible, relatable imagery, and in many ways builds upon the triumphs of Pop Art.

artnet

This fantastic hand-painted multiple by Shepard Fairey is an homage to Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. The art world’s recent embrace of Street Art as a legitimate genre demonstrates the power of accessible, relatable imagery, and in many ways builds upon the triumphs of Pop Art.

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